“Work”
by Kawita VATANAJYANKUR / カウィタ・ヴァタナジャンクール

Term | 会期: 2016. October 28 (Fri) – November 19 (Fri) 

Opening Reception October 28 Fri 19:00-21:30 

open : 11:00-19:00 (Tue-Sat)
Closed : Sunday, Monday, Holidays
オープン:火曜〜土曜 11:00-19:00 / 日月祝祭日 閉廊

Venue | 会場 : CLEAR EDITION & GALLERY, Tokyo
2F, 7-18-8 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 1060032, Japan
東京都港区六本木7-18-8-2F
tel : +81 3 3405 8438

Supported by | 協力 : SONY

More about the artist 作家詳細 |  Kawita Vatanajankur

Facebook event page |

artsy |


ENG follows

この度、クリアエディションではタイを拠点にしている期待の若手女性映像作家、カウィタ・ヴァタナジャンクールの日本 初個展を開催いたします。

ヴァタナジャンクールが探求するのは彼女自身の出身地であるタイの日常の家事や家庭内労働です。タイでは日常の家 事は多くの場合まだ家電によって補助されるものではなく、時間も体力もかかり、たいていの場合女性の仕事とみなさ れています。ヴァタナジャンクールの映像作品に登場する鮮やかな蛍光色、皮肉のこもったユーモア、根底に流れる暴力 性がフェミニストアートの歴史的な文脈に対して現代的かつユニバーサルな視点を与えるのです。彼女は恐怖心と忍耐 力が問われる自身のパフォーマンスに対し「瞑想体勢」であると話してますが、それは我々がいわゆる禅に対して持つイ メージと全くことなります。しかしながらヴァタナジャンクールにとって、究極に追い込まれた身体性や、身体と脳との別 離など、自身を機械とみなすかのように表現いたします。この極端な客観性が身体を彫刻に変えると彼女自身は語りま す。

この力強いシリーズは儀式、工芸、パフォーマンスが持つ長い歴史を比較的新しいメディアであるビデオを通して横断 し、いわゆる「美術」において男性によって文字どおり描かれてきた女性像に対し、ヴァタナジャンクールは女性による作 品が男性のそれに対して創造性が欠けるという風潮を払拭することを目指しております。同時に彼女の作品の特徴とし てはとても受け入れやすく、視覚表現としても魅力的なのがあげられます。根幹の強固なコンセプトはもちろん同時にエ ンターテイニングなのです。カウィタ・ヴァタナジャンクールは作品を通し、身体表現の限界、平凡な家事労働に対する問 い、フェミニズムに対して、さらにはこのグローバルかつデジタルな社会そのものに対して挑戦をしているのです。

この機会にぜひ、ご高覧くださいませ。

 –

We are proud to announce our upcoming solo exhibition by one of the most prominent emerging video artists currently based in Thailand, Kawita Vatanajankur.

Vatanajyankur’s exploration of everyday and domestic work is particularly telling of her Thai homeland. A place where, for many, daily chores aren’t always assisted by electronic contraptions or white goods but are time-consuming, physically exhausting, and often the task of women. The videos’ happy, day-glow colours, dark humour and undercurrents of violence, however, bring a universality and contemporary currency to the historical trajectory of feminist art. It is telling, for instance, that she describes her performances as “meditation postures”, when such gruelling tests of resilience and fear are quite the opposite of what we might think of now as zen. But, for Vatanajyankur, extreme physical endurance offers a way to free herself from her mind: a mechanism to lose her sense of being. This deliberate objectification, she says, turns her body into sculpture.

 

Her powerful series intersect the long histories of ritual, craft and performance with the relatively new medium of video, as a way to redress how women’s work has been considered a lesser form of creativity, than the ‘fine arts’ not long ago epitomized by literally man-made representations of the female body. Uniquely, Vatanajyankur’s work is accessible and visually appealing: substantial in its conceptual rigour, and, at the same time, entertaining. Its lasting effect resonates deeply by asking probing questions; what are the limitations of our bodies, the continuing challenges of mundane labour, and the ongoing tasks for feminism in a globalized and digitally networked world?


<< Back